Sunday, June 22, 2014

Jazz Fest 2014, Day 2: Jake reviews Snarky Puppy

Posted By on Sun, Jun 22, 2014 at 4:00 AM

Snarky Puppy played the Harro East Ballroom. - PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN
  • PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN
  • Snarky Puppy played the Harro East Ballroom.

Hands down, my favorite part of seeing a band live is the spontaneous smile that creeps across a performer's face. I don't mean the "look nice for the crowd and pretend" smile. It's the smile that happens after a musician pulls off a momentous build, or their bandmate wraps up a ridiculous solo. In that moment, you know they're having as much fun as the crowd. That's why Snarky Puppy's stellar second set at Harro East Ballroom on Saturday night will stick with me for a while.

A collective of sorts, members of Snarky Puppy have their regular gigs with acts like Erykah Badu, Kirk Franklin, Justin Timberlake, Roy Hargrove, and Snoop Dogg. A world of influences comes back to Snarky Puppy, and live, this produced an epic-in-scope, rich set.

The eight members on stage -- bandleader and bassist Michael League; Chris Bullock, tenor saxophone; Evan Weiss, trumpet; Justin Stanton, keys and trumpet; Cory Henry, keys and synth; Mark Lettieri, guitar; Nate Werth, percussion; and drummer Robert Searight -- were filled with a contagious youthful energy that the crowd latched onto, bouncing all the way. League runs a tight ship and there was a clear favor toward the grand dramatic in the band's hip fusion.

If there could be any complaint it's that at the softer points of Snarky Puppy's set, a lighter solo or use of sparse instrumentation, the sound didn't carry well across the large, boxy Harro East Ballroom. But when pushing full-sprint, full-volume -- especially during a dual trumpet attack -- those concerns quickly disappeared.

Jason Marsalis joined the band on drums during the final song of the regular set, and on percussion during the two-song encore, reminding me why I love festival shows and why you should always stick around for the finale -- and damn, I could write a full column about that Cory Henry, synth-heavy, swirling finale.

Sunday night I'm checking out French gipsy jazz band Les Doigts De L'Homme at Montage. Just that phrase "French gipsy jazz band" has me excited.

Slideshow
Jazz Fest 2014: Snarky Puppy
Jazz Fest 2014: Snarky Puppy Jazz Fest 2014: Snarky Puppy Jazz Fest 2014: Snarky Puppy Jazz Fest 2014: Snarky Puppy Jazz Fest 2014: Snarky Puppy Jazz Fest 2014: Snarky Puppy Jazz Fest 2014: Snarky Puppy Jazz Fest 2014: Snarky Puppy

Jazz Fest 2014: Snarky Puppy

Snarky Puppy played the Harro East Ballroom on Saturday, June 21 as part of the 2014 Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival.PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Click to View 9 slides

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Jazz Fest 2014, Day 2: Frank reviews Diana Panton, Steve Martin and the Steep Canyon Rangers, and Woody Pines

Posted By on Sun, Jun 22, 2014 at 4:00 AM

Diana Panton performed at Max of Eastman Place. - PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE
  • PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE
  • Diana Panton performed at Max of Eastman Place.

I know it ain't a race or a contest -- in fact I hope we all win -- but in comparing some artists, not all come out equal. Though Julie London remains one of my true loves (she was married to Jack Webb, by the way) Roberta Gambarini's jaw-dropping performance at Kilbourn Hall on opening night single-handedly ruined a lot of lady singers for me. Which leads me to the question: if I hadn't seen Gambarini Friday night, would I have liked Canadian vocalist Diana Panton more?

Panton hovered around a rather mid-tone with minimal flair. I didn't want to hear flair necessarily, but her voice, though airy and sexy, came off a little adolescent. She was good, but good doesn't cut it at this fest anymore as long as Nugent and crew are booking talent that consistently blows doors off and skirts up. Just don't blame Gambarini...

And don't blame me if I disappeared for a few hours tonight. I was in rapt attention of Steve Martin and the Steep Canyon Rangers at Eastman Theatre during the group's second sold-out show of the day. Though softened by Martin's quick wit, the man -- looking like the third Smothers Brother -- served up some righteous bluegrass via his mighty dexterity and skill at the banjo. It was clearly Martin's show but he generously gave attention to everyone on stage, giving each some time to show off.

Edie Brickell, who has composed a musical with Martin, joined the festivities on stage to sing. Things reached their peek on the darkly penned "My Pretty Little One" -- one of the best murder ballads I've ever heard. Things culminated with a hoedown at the end where the fiddler, Nicky Sanders, practically sawed his instrument in half. The place erupted. What an unbelievable show.

Woody Pines played Abilene. - PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE
  • PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE
  • Woody Pines played Abilene.

I ended the night at Abilene as Woody Pines played it just as jumpin' as the Rangers but a couple of clicks closer to rockabilly and rock 'n' roll. The band was essentially drumless, a la Johnny Burnette, but had one in front just in case. But I'm telling you, the kids in the street don't need a drum to feel the beat.

Tune in tomorrow night folks, same Bat-time, same Bat-channel as I dig deeper into this whole murder ballad thing with the Rachel Brooke Band. And don't forget; drink more Ovaltine.

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Jazz Fest 2014, Day 2: Ron reviews Jason Marsalis Vibes Quartet, Sunna Gunnlaugs Trio, and the John Escreet/Tyshawn Sorey Duo

Posted By on Sun, Jun 22, 2014 at 4:00 AM




Jason Marsalis performed as part of a quartet at Kilbourn Hall. - PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK
  • PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK
  • Jason Marsalis performed as part of a quartet at Kilbourn Hall.

At Kilbourn Hall on Saturday night, the Jason Marsalis Vibes Quartet provided a stark counterpoint to many XRIJF bands. Instead of the loose-fitting clothes favored by physically active musicians, all four of them wore suits and ties. This buttoned-down look would seem to contradict the freedom inherent in jazz, but even that freedom was under control. There were no 20-minute rambling tunes here; each composition lasted about five minutes. Marsalis kept glancing at his watch (at least eight times). A one-hour set was going to last one hour.

If all of the above sounds negative, it's not. I just found it to be a fascinatingly different approach from a unique jazz personality. In fact, Marsalis and his band were great. It was refreshing to have each tune be a distinctive entity rather than a meandering jam. There were beautiful ballads ("Nights In Brooklyn") and sneaky sounding melodies ("B.P. Shakedown") and even a tone poem of sorts about a man who could not dance.

Solos were short, but excellent, with an occasional quote from a Monk tune or another classic. These well-groomed men let loose in their music in a manner reminiscent of a dressed-up 1950's band. Marsalis' polite demeanor did not prevent him from some astute political remarks that drew applause from the crowd. The show ended at exactly 7:02 with a standing ovation but no encore.

Jason Marsalis Vibes Quartet played Kilbourn Hall. - PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK
  • PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK
  • Jason Marsalis Vibes Quartet played Kilbourn Hall.

Over at the Lutheran Church, the Sunna Gunnlaugs Trio proved to be a little too milquetoast for my taste. Gunnlaugs is a fine pianist, but her set seem pre-programmed, with the band taking few, if any, risks. Still, she is a beautifully melodic player with a style that worked well on the group's cover of Tom Waits' "Johnsburg, Illinois." Gunnlaugs saved the best for last, with the entire group coming alive on a song titled "Gallop."

The John Escreet/Tyshawn Sorey Duo, over at Christ Church, made me suddenly desirous of a little milquetoast. I'm not sure if they were relentlessly experimental from start to finish, but they certainly were from the start until I was finished with them 25 minutes later.

Escreet banged at the piano while Sorey banged at the drums. Sometimes Escreet's hands went inside the piano to make meaningless noises there. Sometimes Sorey threw drumsticks in the direction of the audience. At no time while I was there did they approach playing anything I would call music.

Sunday night, I can't wait to see Cécile McLorinSalvant, one of the most heralded new singers on the jazz scene today, at Kilbourn Hall. Then I'll catch the young pianist Gerald Clayton at Hatch Hall and bassist Euan Burton's group at Christ Church.

Tyshawn Sorey played at Christ Church. - PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN
  • PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN
  • Tyshawn Sorey played at Christ Church.
John Escreet played at Christ Church. - PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN
  • PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN
  • John Escreet played at Christ Church.


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Jazz Fest 2014, Day 2: Nicole reviews Ryan Dilmore

Posted By on Sun, Jun 22, 2014 at 1:22 AM

Ryan Dilmore performed at The Little Theatre. - PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK
  • PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK
  • Ryan Dilmore performed at The Little Theatre.

Singer-songwriter Ryan Dilmore's stripped-down performance at the Little Theatre was simple and lyrical. While Jazz Fest typically calls to mind images of funky bands playing on big outdoor stages, Dilmore's music was a welcome reprieve from the fray.

A Victor native, Dilmore said that the opportunity to perform at the festival was "honestly a dream come true." He recalled memories of attending with his friends before he moved to California several years ago.

Dilmore's excitement and nervousness were apparent when he fumbled over words between sets, but he played with a contagious ease. His lyric-heavy songs were chock full of clever rhymes -- something reminiscent of early Jason Mraz. Although each piece was similar and somewhat bled into the next, Dilmore's comfort with his guitar sucked me in. I found myself wanting more.

Unfortunately, festival patrons made it almost impossible for me to keep my attention on Dilmore. He couldn't make it through a single song without a group of people entering or leaving the venue with what seemed like complete disregard for the fact that a musician was on stage sharing his art. I know that this is the nature of music festivals, but in this particular venue, it was highly distracting. At the very least, antsy patrons could have saved their movement for in between songs.

Although Dilmore wasn't the kind of act I expected to see at the festival, I'll certainly be listening to more of his work.

Tomorrow, I'll switch gears completely when I take in the Brubeck Brothers Quartet at Harro East Ballroom. My expectations are high for a group featuring two members of one of America's most accomplished musical families.

Ryan Dilmore performed at The Little Theatre. - PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK
  • PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK
  • Ryan Dilmore performed at The Little Theatre.
Ryan Dilmore performed at The Little Theatre. - PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK
  • PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK
  • Ryan Dilmore performed at The Little Theatre.

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Saturday, June 21, 2014

Jazz Fest 2014, Day 1: Frank reviews Roberta Gambarini, Janelle Monae, Big Bad Voodoo Daddy, and Nikki Hill

Posted By on Sat, Jun 21, 2014 at 4:00 AM

Tonight started off with a sweet ka-boom as we followed the notes Tuscan beauty Roberta Gambarini squeezed out into oblivion. The queen of fade and control, Gambarini and her trio peppered the set with Argentinian, American, and Italian classics elegantly and effortlessly.

Dressed like a leopard print mermaid, Gambarini affected the tones of saxophone and trumpet both quasi-literally when actual words bubbled up in her zippy scat and literally when she imitated a trumpet. Oh, and let's not forget her from-the-floor-to-heaven's-door vocal range.

Roberta Gambarini's band played Kilbourn Hall. - PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE
  • PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE
  • Roberta Gambarini's band played Kilbourn Hall.
Big Bad Voodoo Daddy played the City of Rochester East Ave. & Chestnut St. Stage. - PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE
  • PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE
  • Big Bad Voodoo Daddy played the City of Rochester East Ave. & Chestnut St. Stage.
Janelle Monae performed at Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre. - PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE
  • PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE
  • Janelle Monae performed at Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre.

They tell me Janelle Monae is on the rise and it's easy to say why. The set was sci-fi cool with a nod to the Mothership as Monae rolled out in a straitjacket and bandages like Hannibal Lecter and Dr. Frankenstein creation. The energy was straight-up nuclear and loud. She came out on 11 and stayed there.

Nikki Hill performed at Abilene. - PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE
  • PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE
  • Nikki Hill performed at Abilene.

The crowd was on its feet from the start and stayed, but Big Bad Voodoo Daddy was down the street so I couldn't stay. I hidey-hauled my ass down to the happening scene.

What started out as a more tongue-in-cheek swing band has become a slick outfit and easily one of the best jumpin' jive bands alive. Yup, Big Bad Voodoo Daddy killed it on the Chestnut Street stage for thousands of would-be lindy-hoppers. The thunder of the band's drummer was contained by a giant plastic sneeze guard. Other than that, the band looked decadently vintage ... and sounded that way too with an expertly brash blast of timeless brass.

Nikki Hill had 'em lined up down the street all the way to East Avenue. Abilene's later show was just as packed with a howlingly enthusiastic crowd, brought to its feet by Hill's feline purr and growl. Singing like Barbara Pittman beneath a pile of bouffant hair, Hill had the Abilene crowd on it's feet and in the aisles -- so did Monae except she demanded it, Hills fans did it on their own. Just sayin'. And while all eyes are on Hill and her statuesque curves, a few of us eyeballed her hubby, Matt Hill on the guitar. The spirit of Johnny "Guitar" Watson and Tarheel Slim was in the tent that night. Have mercy... onto day 2.

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Jazz Fest 2014, Day 1: Nicole reviews Lorraine Klaasen

Posted By on Sat, Jun 21, 2014 at 4:00 AM

Lorraine Klaasen at the Xerox Auditorium. - PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN
  • PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN
  • Lorraine Klaasen at the Xerox Auditorium.

From the moment Lorraine Klaasen opened her mouth, the singer brought vibrancy, in every sense of the word, to the otherwise bleak Xerox Auditorium space. Decked out in exciting colors and filling the stuffy hall with full-bodied gritty vocals, Klaasen was riffing and growling with each note. It was clear she was there to have a good time.

And the audience responded well -- she had people dancing in the aisles. Although most of us were confined to seats, you'd have been hard pressed to find a body that wasn't moving in some way. Still, Klaasen's performance style might have been better served in a more intimate, casual venue. Her simple, joyful approach to singing could be perfect for a café or bar setting.

Klaasen's distinct musical style is culturally charged and you can hear the influence of her South African heritage in every note. None of it is manufactured -- she's as authentic as it gets. The personal nature of her performance was particularly apparent in a song titled "Lorraine," a letter written to Klaasen from her mother, set to music.

Above all else, it was Klaasen's storytelling ability that really made her a show-stopping performer. Although most of the songs she performed weren't in English, I could still understand every word. Her body language and facial expressions were loud and clear, emotion emanating through every pore.

Slideshow
Jazz Fest 2014: Lorraine Klaasen
Jazz Fest 2014: Lorraine Klaasen Jazz Fest 2014: Lorraine Klaasen Jazz Fest 2014: Lorraine Klaasen Jazz Fest 2014: Lorraine Klaasen Jazz Fest 2014: Lorraine Klaasen Jazz Fest 2014: Lorraine Klaasen

Jazz Fest 2014: Lorraine Klaasen

Lorraine Klaasen played the Xerox Auditorium on Friday, June 20 as part of the Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival.PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Click to View 7 slides


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Jazz Fest 2014, Day 1: Ron reviews Sun Trio, Partisans, and Holophonor

Posted By on Sat, Jun 21, 2014 at 4:00 AM

At the Lutheran Church Friday night, Finland's Sun Trio seemed caught between the past and future of jazz. When trumpeter Jorma Kalevi Louhivuori played his instrument traditionally he had exceptional range, from melodic to abstract, and from gorgeous to guttural. Simply put, the man had incredible chops. But, about half the time, he insisted on adding electronics to the mix, using pedals to distort and loop and another devise to harmonize. Sometimes he'd put the trumpet to his side but it was still playing.

The best moment of the concert came on a ballad when Louhivuori, and his superb bassist (Antti Lötjönen) and drummer (Olavi Louhivuori), gradually worked their way into such an other-worldly sound that it left the reality of the trumpet, bass, and drums behind. Ironically they didn't need any of the electronics to work that magic.

Slideshow
Jazz Fest 2014: Sun Trio
Jazz Fest 2014: Sun Trio Jazz Fest 2014: Sun Trio Jazz Fest 2014: Sun Trio Jazz Fest 2014: Sun Trio Jazz Fest 2014: Sun Trio Jazz Fest 2014: Sun Trio

Jazz Fest 2014: Sun Trio

Sun Trio played at the Lutheran Church of the Reformation on Friday, June 20 as part of the 2014 Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival. PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Click to View 7 slides

Over at Christ Church, the British band Partisans played its unique brand of punk jazz. At least that's what it seemed like to me as rock-oriented guitarist Phil Robson dueled with hard bop saxophonist Julian Siegel. They were both excellent players (as were bassist Thaddeus Kelly and drummer Gene Calderazzo) but the sound left a lot to be desired.

When Partisans got deep into an evocative piece like "Swamp," which conjured up the sounds of a swamp heightened to nightmare proportions, the cavernous room echoed and muddied the instruments. The church is perfect for acoustic music; electric guitars just don't work well there.

Earlier in the evening I caught Holophonor, seven young musicians from the Thelonious Monk Institute, at Max of Eastman Place. Trumpeter Mike Cottone, a Rochesterian and Eastman School of Music Graduate, seemed to be the leader, at least in his hometown.

Every one of the band members took fine solos. Especially strong were Miro Sprague on piano and Diego Urbano playing with four mallets on the vibraphone. Jonathan Pinson anchored the band well on drums.

On Cottone's tune, "The Puncher," saxophonist Josh Johnson, trombonist Eric Miller and Cottone played some complex unison runs effortlessly. Bassist Dave Robaire's "Misconception," a bluesy tune that veered in unexpected directions, was my favorite of their compositions, recalling -- appropriately enough -- the work of Thelonious Monk.

A few audience members may have been disappointed that no one in the group was actually playing a holophonor. Originating on the TV series "Futurama," a holophonor is a 31st-century musical instrument combining an oboe and a holographic projector. I wasn't disappointed; I'm just happy to finally have that picture phone I saw on "The Jetsons."

Saturday night I'm looking forward to hearing the Jason Marsalis Vibes Quartet at Kilbourn Hall, the Sunna Gunnlaugs Trio at the Lutheran Church, and John Escrett at Christ Church.

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Friday, June 20, 2014

JAZZ FEST 2014: Meet City's jazz bloggers

Get to know Ron, Frank, Nicole, and Jake

Posted on Fri, Jun 20, 2014 at 4:00 AM

Ron Netsky

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XRIJF Music Director John Nugent's slogan, "It's not who you know, it's who you don't know," rings true for me. Every year at the festival, I purposely seek out artists I don't know and that usually means taking in acts from the United Kingdom and Scandinavia. So it's a good bet you'll find this atheist at either Christ Church (Made In The UK) or the Lutheran Church (Nordic Jazz) every night.

But it's not just the foreign acts. I've never seen the new singing sensation Cecile McLorinSalvant, formidable pianist Stephanie Trick, or percussionist Scott Feiner & Pandeiro Jazz. But, based on their excellent recordings and videos, I can't wait to experience them live.

Of course I'm also looking forward to acts I do know, like the wonderful singer Tessa Souter and the superb pianist Manuel Valera who have both performed at previous festivals. I've heard drummer Louis Hayes on some of my favorite records by Cannonball Adderley and John Coltrane, but I've never heard him live.

And I'm looking forward to the great XRIJF spirit. For nine days every June downtown Rochester is transformed into the vibrant epicenter of jazz.

I'll start the festival Friday night at Max of Eastman Place with Holophonor, a diverse group of young musicians who have one thing in common -- they're all associated with the Thelonious Monk Jazz Institute. Then I'll head over to the Lutheran Church to catch Sun Trio, an intriguing group from Finland. I'll follow that with another new (to me) group at Christ Church; Partisans is at the forefront of the progressive British jazz scene.

My real job is Chairman of the Art Department at Nazareth College but my love of music goes back to my childhood. My grandfather was a bandleader, my uncle was a Broadway composer and both of my brothers are musicians. My younger brother Hankus led bands with future jazz greats like Don Byron and Marty Ehrlich and my twin brother Steve's early groups included top players like Uri Caine and David Finck. So I've always been around great music. I've been writing about jazz for City since the late-1990's.



Frank De Blase

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The two months out of the year that we dare to call summer are just the best, aren't they? And I'm not just raving about the heat and the fact that it's tube top and bikini season, but here in our dirty little city along the mighty Genesee, it's Jazz Fest time where all of downtown bristles with excitement and its own soundtrack.  It's filled with all kinds of music within and outside the jazz idiom to love, to explore, and discover.

For all the shows I'm excited to see, like tonight's Nikki Hill performance at the Abilene stage, there's stuff I know little about that I'm going to take a stab at, like Roberta Gambarini at Max. Join me while I stumble around the scene keeping my ears open for something swingin', something boppin', and something blue, and my eyes peeled for those tube tops.

City Newspaper's staff music writer -- going on 14 years (ask me for some stories) -- I've covered the Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival since its beginnings.



Nicole Milano

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As a newbie to this year's Jazz Festival blogging crew, I'm just excited to be in the crowd and a part of it all. I'll begin my experience on Friday at Xerox Auditorium, where I'll take in Lorraine Klaasen's deep, soulful vocals. As a vocalist myself, I'm excited to experience Klaasen's live performance, as she is known for her dynamic stage presence.

As the festival goes on, I'll be on the lookout for the strong vocalists and the more outside-the-box acts. I'm especially excited for Ibrahim Electric, a quirky Danish trio who will bring an eclectic style to Montage on Saturday, June 27; and Ester Rada, a rising international star with a powerful voice and wide appeal who will perform on the festival's final night. I'm also excited to see the Brubeck Brothers Quartet on Sunday, June 22. With such impressive musical genes, it's virtually impossible for these guys to disappoint.

I will be honest with you, though, above and beyond the music, it's impossible to deny my excitement for the many food trucks that station themselves on Gibbs and Main during the festival. See you there.

A writer and musician with a deep appreciation for all things jazz, I hold a Bachelor of Music degree from Syracuse University, and spent many of my younger days performing on both vocals and alto saxophone. Currently, I work full-time as a Writing and Editing Specialist at Writing Solutions Group, a small writing firm in High Falls.



Jake Clapp

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I won't add some unneeded flowery language. Simply put, I'm beyond excited for my first Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival. As City Newspaper's Arts & Entertainment Editor, it's been a lot of work and preparation up to this point -- with still more work to come -- but now I'm antsy. I just want that music.

I was born and raised in Louisiana where Swamp blues and New Orleans jazz is soaked into virtually every aspect of life -- arguably more than the food and beer. I've put in my paces at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival; been to my fair share of French Quarter piano bars; and talked with those old juke joint cats who've seen it all. And I'm now counting myself lucky to find a new home in a city that truly prizes jazz and these remarkable artists. Rochester, I think we'll get along just swell.

Along with coordinating coverage -- and burning the midnight oil posting blogs -- of course I'll be at as many shows as I can fit in.

Most important, though, we want to know what you think. Leave your comments on the blogs, or post them to Facebook, or Tweet us.

Who are you most excited to see at this year's Jazz Festival?

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Thursday, June 19, 2014

Jazz Fest 2014: What's FREE at the Fest

More than 80 free concerts at 6 venues

Posted By on Thu, Jun 19, 2014 at 4:00 AM

While the Eastman Theatre headliners and Club Pass shows require tickets, the 2014 Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival is loaded with free concerts -- more than 80 free shows on 6 stages during the nine-day festival (June 20-28).

These concerts tend to fill up, so if you want a good spot, show up early (and remember a folding chair). For more information and schedule updates, visit the Jazz Festival's website, and follow @roccitynews on Twitter for the latest details on all things Jazz Fest.



Venues

Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County(115 South Avenue) Free shows June 23-27

City of Rochester Jazz Street Stage (Gibbs Street at East Avenue) Free music daily

City of Rochester East Avenue & Chestnut Street Stage Free shows June 20-21, 27-28

City of Rochester East Avenue & Alexander Street Stage Free shows June 28

RG&E-LiDestri Spirit Stage(corner of East Ave. & Chestnut St.) Free shows June 22-26

State Street Bar & Grill(Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St.) Free jazz jams starting nightly at 10:30 p.m.




Friday, June 20

4:30 p.m.: Hilton High School Jazz Band (Jazz Street Stage)

5:15 p.m.: Canandaigua High School Jazz Band (Jazz Street Stage)

6:00 p.m.: ECMS Mike Kaupa Combo and Paul Hofmann Combo (Jazz Street Stage)

7:00 p.m.: Gem City (East Ave. & Chestnut St. Stage)

7:15 p.m.: Rob Mostert Hammond Group (Jazz Street Stage)

9:00 p.m.: Big Bad Voodoo Daddy (East Ave. & Chestnut St. Stage)

9:15 p.m.: Rob Mostert Hammond Group (Jazz Street Stage)

10:30 p.m.: XRIJF Nightly Jazz Session with The Bob Sneider Trio (State St. Bar & Grill at the Rochester Plaza Hotel)

Saturday, June 21

3:45 p.m.: Brighton High School Jazz Band (Jazz Street Stage)

4:30 p.m.: Brockport High School Jazz Band (Jazz Street Stage)

5:15 p.m.: Pittsford Sutherland High School Jazz Band (Jazz Street Stage)

6:00 p.m.: Bob Sneider Jazz Combo and Mike Kaupa RCSD Combo (Jazz Street Stage)

7:00 p.m.: Spectra (East Ave. & Chestnut St. Stage)

7:15 p.m.: Mingo Fishtrap (Jazz Street Stage)

9:00 p.m.: Lou Gramm Band (East Ave. & Chestnut St. Stage)

9:15 p.m.: Mingo Fishtrap (Jazz Street Stag(e

10:30 p.m.: XRIJF Nightly Jazz Sessions with The Bob Sneider Trio (State St. Bar & Grill at the Rochester Plaza Hotel)

Sunday, June 22

3:45 p.m.: West Irondequoit High School Jazz Band (Jazz Street Stage)

4:30 p.m.: Newark High School Jazz Band (Jazz Street Stage)

5:15 p.m.: Spencerport High School Jazz Band (Jazz Street Stage)

6:00 p.m.: Jimmy Robbins Jazz Sextet (Jazz Street Stage)

7:00 p.m.: Bill Tiberio Band (RG&E-LiDestri Spirit Stage)

7:15 p.m.: JAZZ.FM91 Youth Big Band (Jazz Street Stage)

9:00 p.m.: Bill Tiberio Band (RG&E-LiDestri Spirit Stage)

9:15 p.m.: JAZZ.FM91 Youth Big Band (Jazz Street Stage)

10:30 p.m.: XRIJF Nightly Jazz Session with The Bob Sneider Trio (State St. Bar & Grill at the Rochester Plaza Hotel)

Monday, June 23

12:00 p.m.: John Nyerges Quartet (Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County)

4:30 p.m.: Greece Arcadia High School Jazz Band (Jazz Street Stage)

5:15 p.m.: Bloomfield High School Jazz Band (Jazz Street Stage)

6:00 p.m.: Wendy Eisenberg's Earth Science (Jazz Street Stage)

7:00 p.m.: MVT (RG&E-LiDestri Spirit Stage)

7:15 p.m.: Hot Club of Detroit (Jazz Street Stage)

8:00 p.m.: ESM-XRIJF Gerry Niewood Jazz Scholarships Performance (Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre)

9:00 p.m.: MVT (RG&E-LiDestri Spirit Stage)

9:15 p.m.: Hot Club of Detroit (Jazz Street Stage)

10:30 p.m.: XRIJF Nightly Jazz Session with The Bob Sneider Trio (State St. Bar & Grill at the Rochester Plaza Hotel)

Tuesday, June 24

12:00 p.m.: Gabe Condon (Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County)

4:30 p.m.: Greece Athena High School Jazz Band (Jazz Street Stage)

5:15 p.m.: Fairport High School Jazz Band (Jazz Street Stage)

6:00 p.m.: New Horizons Big Band (Jazz Street Stage)

7:00 p.m.: Significant Other (RG&E-LiDestri Spirit Stage)

7:15 p.m.: Fred Costello (Jazz Street Stage)

9:00 p.m.: Significant Other (RG&E-LiDestri Spirit Stage)

9:15 p.m.: Fred Costello (Jazz Street Stage)

10:30 p.m.: XRIJF Nightly Jazz Session with The Bob Sneider Trio (State St. Bar & Grill at the Rochester Plaza Hotel)

Wednesday, June 25

12:00 p.m.: Mel Henderson and Paradigm Shift (Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County)

4:30 p.m.: Eastridge High School Jazz Band (Jazz Street Stage)

5:15 p.m.: Greece Olympia High School Jazz Band (Jazz Street Stage)

6:00 p.m.: ESM-XRIJF Jazz Scholarships Alumni (Jazz Street Stage)

7:00 p.m.: Cyndi Cain (RG&E-LiDestri Spirit Stage)

7:15 p.m.: Eastman Youth Jazz Orchestra, New Horizons Vintage Jazz Band, & Music Educators Big Band (Jazz Street Stage)

9:00 p.m.: Cyndi Cain (RG&E-LiDestri Spirit Stage)

9:15 p.m.: Eastman Youth Jazz Orchestra, New Horizons Vintage Jazz Band, & Music Educators Big Band (Jazz Street Stage)

10:30 p.m.: XRIJF Nightly Jazz Session with The Bob Sneider Trio (State St. Bar & Grill at the Rochester Plaza Hotel)

Thursday, June 26

12:00 p.m.: Nate Rawls (Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County) 

3:45 p.m.: Greece Odyssey High School Jazz Band (Jazz Street Stage)

4:30 p.m.: Webster Thomas High School Jazz Band (Jazz Street Stage)

5:15 p.m.: Honeoye Falls Lima High School Jazz Band (Jazz Street Stage)

6:00 p.m.: ECMS Saxology I and Saxology II (Jazz Street Stage)

7:00 p.m.: Shine (RG&E-LiDestri Spirit Stage)

7:15 p.m.: Soul Stew (Jazz Street Stage)

9:00 p.m.: Shine (RG&E-LiDestri Spirit Stage)

9:15 p.m.: Soul Stew (Jazz Street Stage)

10:30 p.m.: XRIJF Nightly Jazz Session with The Bob Sneider Trio (State St. Bar & Grill at the Rochester Plaza Hotel)

Friday, June 27

12:00 p.m.: Vince Ercolamento (Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County)

3:45 p.m.: Gates-Chili High School Jazz Band (Jazz Street Stage)

4:30 p.m.: Pittsford Mendon High School Jazz Band (Jazz Street Stage)

5:15 p.m.: Buffalo Academy High School Jazz Band (Jazz Street Stage)

6:00 p.m.: ECMS Latin Jazz and Junior Jazz (Jazz Street Stage)

7:00 p.m.: Ester Rada (East Ave. & Chestnut St. Stage)

7:15 p.m.: Hypnotic Brass Ensemble (Jazz Street Stage)

9:00 p.m.: Marcus Miller Band (East Ave. & Chestnut St. Stage)

9:15 p.m.: Hypnotic Brass Ensemble (Jazz Street Stage)

10:30 p.m.: XRIJF Nightly Jazz Session with The Bob Sneider Trio (State St. Bar & Grill at the Rochester Plaza Hotel)

Saturday, June 28

3:45 p.m.: MCC Jazz Band (Jazz Street Stage)

4:30 p.m.: Webster Schroeder High School Jazz Band (Jazz Street Stage)

5:15 p.m.: School of the Arts High School Jazz Band (Jazz Street Stage)

6:00 p.m.: Gomeh Barak Quintet (Jazz Street Stage)

7:00 p.m.: The London Souls (East Ave. & Chestnut St. Stage)

7:00 p.m.: Prime Time Funk (East Ave. & Alexander St. Stage)

7:15 p.m.: John "Papa" Gros Band (Jazz Street Stage)

9:00 p.m.: Soulive (East Ave. & Alexander St. Stage) 

9:00 p.m.: George Thorogood and The Destroyers (East Ave. & Chestnut St. Stage) 

9:15 p.m.: John "Papa" Gros Band (Jazz Street Stage)

10:30 p.m.: XRIJF Nightly Jazz Session with The Bob Sneider Trio (State St. Bar & Grill at the Rochester Plaza Hotel)


Get more reviews and information with CITY's Daily Jazz Blogs, updated every day of the festival!




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Wednesday, March 26, 2014

CONCERT UPDATE: Lilac Fest announces three headliners

Rusted Root, The Original Wailers, and Eddie Money will perform free shows

Posted on Wed, Mar 26, 2014 at 5:09 PM

The Rochester Lilac Festival today announced three headliners for the 2014 edition of the festival, which will take place May 9-17 in Highland Park.

The concerts announced for the newly named CarMax Center Stage are:

-World-music/pop/jam act Rusted Root, which will perform Thursday, May 15.

-Reggae legends The Original Wailers, performing Saturday, May 17.

-Pop/rock act Eddie Money, he of the two tickets to paradise and taking you home tonight, who will play Sunday, May 18.

All concerts are free, as is admission to the festival.

The full 10-day concert lineup and schedule of events will be released on Monday, April 7. For more information visit LilacFestival.com.

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