Film Review: Tomorrowland

Film Review: Tomorrowland

A dream unfulfilled

 

Film Review: "Maggie"

Yawn of the dead
Hello, and welcome to another installment of "I Saw This Movie So You Don't Have To!" Yes, "I Tilled Your Garden So You Don't Have To" probably would have been much more helpful, but I figured I'd take one for the team and bear witness to the dull zombie drama "Maggie," Arnold Schwarzenegger's crack at being a real thespian.

Movie Reviews

Film Review: "It's All So Quiet"

The early scenes in Dutch filmmaker Nanouk Leopold's "It's All So Quiet" are unsparing in their depiction of caring for an elderly person no longer able to care for themselves. In Helmer's case, however, as he painstakingly moves his father from the first floor to a second-floor bedroom, the entrenched passive-aggression is palpable, with far more of the latter than the former.

Movie Reviews

Film Review: "Iris"

The penultimate film from renowned documentarian Albert Maysles, the delightful "Iris" profiles nonagenarian fashion icon Iris Apfel. With her trademark look (owl-like eye glasses, half a dozen gaudy bangles on each arm, and ropes of enormous necklaces) adorning her tiny frame, it often seems a wonder that she doesn't topple over.

Movie Reviews

Film Review: "Far from the Madding Crowd"

Love which is strong as death
"I'd hate to become some man's property," the forthright Bathsheba Everdene says to her gently spurned suitor. It's 1870 in Dorset, England, and despite her penniless status, Bathsheba values her independence above everything, a nontraditional mindset that will serve her well when an unexpected inheritance bequeaths her a large farm.

Movie Reviews

Film Review: "Don't Think I've Forgotten"

A mashup of traditional sounds and Western pop, Cambodia had a fertile music scene from the mid 50's to the mid 70's, supported by a monarchy devoted to the arts. When capitol city Phnom Penh fell to the Khmer Rouge in 1975, however, that all changed.

Movie Reviews

Film Review: "Mad Max: Fury Road"

Fast and furious
During a Q&A following the premiere of "Mad Max: Fury Road," director George Miller namechecked film historian Kevin Brownlow and his seminal book, "The Parade's Gone By," citing it as a crucial instructional tool for any director of modern action films. That book, focusing on the silent film era, provides a clue as to why, with its scant dialogue, big emotions, and epic storytelling, "Mad Max: Fury Road" itself frequently feels like an old silent movie.

Movie Reviews

Film Review: "Félix and Meira"

External affairs
When it comes to tales of forbidden romance in the movies, audiences tend to expect a certain amount of passion. They want sexy stories about couples whose desire for one another burns up the screen, so we never question that they must be together no matter what the cost.

Movie Reviews

Film Review: "Lambert & Stamp"

History lessons
To fledgling filmmakers Kit Lambert and Chris Stamp, it seemed like a great idea: Find a rock group to manage and then make an artsy documentary about the process. Colleagues at England's Shepperton Studios in the early 1960's, Lambert and Stamp were unlikely friends; the former enjoyed a posh but closeted upbringing as the son of a renowned classical composer, while the latter came up in the working-class East End, the son of a tugboat captain (and little brother to the supremely cool Terence Stamp).

Movie Reviews

Film Review: "The Water Diviner"

Just a glance at his filmography -- "Gladiator," "Master and Commander," "Noah" -- tells you that Russell Crowe knows about starring in sweeping historical epics, so it's a little frustrating that he seems to have learned nothing from Scott, Weir, Aronofsky, et al., about how to direct them. Crowe stars in his disappointing feature-filmmaking debut, "The Water Diviner," as Joshua Connor, an Australian man who travels to Turkey to hunt for his three soldier sons, presumed dead four years earlier in the devastating campaign at Gallipoli in 1915.

Movie Reviews

Film Review: "Cheatin'"

It's the best policy
The thing about love is that there's too much that our limited language prevents us from truly expressing, so it's fortunate that there exist artists who are able to convey the tangled emotions that mere words can't. If you've ever seen any of animator Bill Plympton's award-winning work, you know that he rarely relies on dialogue anyway.

Movie Reviews

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