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Rebecca reviews "My Name is Rachel Corrie" 

MuCCC hosted an important work of art the past two nights. The one-woman show, "My Name is Rachel Corrie," chronicles the life of a young American Peace Activist who traveled to Gaza in 2003 with the International Solidarity Movement to defend Palestinian homes from being demolished. Corrie was killed by an Israeli bulldozer while protecting a host family's house from being destroyed.

This work is "fringe" in the saddest sense of the word, as it presents an underrepresented reality that Americans are still, by and large, discouraged from exploring.

click to enlarge Ashley Malloy in "My Name is Rachel Corrie" - PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN
  • PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN
  • Ashley Malloy in "My Name is Rachel Corrie"

From young actor Ashley Malloy's crushing performance, we learn that Corrie was aware of the media's misrepresentation of efforts such as hers. She was sensitive to the historic suffering of Jewish people, but saw the necessity for criticism of Israeli state policy, for supporting Palestinian self-determination, and for protesting atrocity.

click to enlarge Ashley Malloy in "My Name is Rachel Corrie" - PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN
  • PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN
  • Ashley Malloy in "My Name is Rachel Corrie"

As a representation of the writings of an awake and heartbroken defender of innocents, this play is politically charged, but the play itself isn't political art. It's a coming-of-age story, shortened by blind brutality. It's the story of a girl who sought to be a poet, who instead stumbled upon defending a population of humans forsaken by the powerful and unacknowledged by the privileged.

Malloy's portrayal of each and every stage of Corries's development is immaculate. Within the space of about 90 minutes, she smoothly moves the character from a franticly earnest youth to an extremely bewildered but present and determined and articulate young adult.

Corrie repeatedly reiterates in her journals and emails to her parents how nothing could have prepared her for the dehumanizing reality lived by those she defended. Malloy's pantomiming and vocal escalations enveloped the audience in a vivid world of violently-enforced curfews, infrastructure- and livelihood-destroying checkpoints, a growing abundance of sniper towers, the perpetual buzz of Apache helicopters, destroyed wells and greenhouses, and the daily threat to houses by bulldozer or tank-mounted missiles.

These conditions amount to unadulterated terrorism, and these journals could have been written yesterday.

click to enlarge Ashley Malloy in "My Name is Rachel Corrie" - PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN
  • PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN
  • Ashley Malloy in "My Name is Rachel Corrie"

Malloy crushingly conveys every moment of Corrie's clarity, and her empathy and respect for her Palestinian hosts and for her parents as they try to understand her mission through their lens of devastated concern. To the end, Corrie's frustration and despair at the enormity of the situation -- as well as her fierce resolve -- is palpable through Malloy's wide and disillusioned eyes.

In This Guide...

    Rebecca reviews "The Steele Sisters: Comedy Sword-Fighting Show" and "The Nameless Days of Gumdrop Smith"

    The two ladies who comprise "The Steele Sisters: Comedy Sword-Fighting Show" gave the kind of playful, riotous performance that makes you wish they were your buddies. Gwendolyn and Gertrude Steele, dressed in fanciful layers of medieval garb, took the stage at Blackfriars Theatre and revved the audience into a participatory frenzy with a few playful false-starts before actually beginning the show.

    Rebecca reviews "The Steele Sisters: Comedy Sword-Fighting Show" and "The Nameless Days of Gumdrop Smith"

    The two ladies who comprise "The Steele Sisters: Comedy Sword-Fighting Show" gave the kind of playful, riotous performance that makes you wish they were your buddies. Gwendolyn and Gertrude Steele, dressed in fanciful layers of medieval garb, took the stage at Blackfriars Theatre and revved the audience into a participatory frenzy with a few playful false-starts before actually beginning the show.

    Frank reviews Hopeless Romantic

    The term hopeless romantic makes about as much sense to me as the phrase guilty pleasure. If you're a romantic then you're far from hopeless.

    Rebecca reviews "Merely Players"

    The Sunday, September 21, performance of "Merely Players" felt a bit rushed, as though there was too much content for the hour-long performance. The small troupe flew through one select scene from each of several of Shakespeare's more popular plays, which at times included masks, pantomime, and puppetry.

    Adam reviews "Vintage Hitchcock," "Solo Drum Solo," and "God of Carnage"

    Screen Plays' performance of "Vintage Hitchcock" got my afternoon off to a great start. A packed crowd filled the Dryden Theatre, eager to experience the old-timey goodness of a live radio play -- and the performers more than delivered.

    David reviews "A Page of Madness," "Coffee With God," and "The Last Five Years"

    What better way to spend a sunny Sunday afternoon than in a Japanese madhouse? That is the setting for "KuruttaIppeji," or "A Page of Madness," a recently discovered silent film from 1926 by the Japanese director Teinosuke Kinugasa.

    Jake reviews Sound ExChange

    Recently, Sound ExChange received a grant from the Max and Marian Farash Charitable Foundation to produce its "01X Project," a series of concerts that aim to integrate the audience into the performance through technology and visual art. The group -- an artist collective that formed at the Eastman School -- partnered with RIT photography professor Susan Lakin and computer science professor Joe Geigel, and Katie Verrant, a new media design student at RIT, to really push "01X" into new interdisciplinary spaces.

    Adam reviews the RIT School of Film and Animation Student Honors Show and "Trending"

    I started my third day of the Fringe Festival by heading over to the Little Theatre to catch the RIT School of Film and Animation Student Honors Show. Speaking before the screening began, Administrative Chair Malcolm Spaull explained that the program was curated by faculty members to incorporate each type of film (narrative, documentary, experimental, along with 2D, 3D, and stop-motion animation), with works by students from every year of the program -- from first year BFA students to those in their final year of their Masters -- being represented.

    Frank reviews The Younger Gang

    As the ghosts of so many mondo-cool rock shows of years gone by bounced off the walls of the empty pool that is Manhatan Square Park, The Younger Gang conjured bluegrassy boogiemen and specters of its own. This string-driven quartet takes the vintage patina of old-tyme music and applies it to a slightly modernized sound.

    Casey reviews PUSH Physical Theatre and "Germination"

    PUSH Physical Theatre is always entertaining, but it has deep ideas to communicate as well. Through movement, of course.

    David reviews "W.A.C. Iraq" and "Bernhardt on Broadway"

    Rochester Latino Theatre Company's "W.A.C. Iraq" takes a complicated subject and presents it in a simple, powerful way. This tribute to Latina women in the Armed Forces who have served in Iraq honors their contributions, details their sacrifices, and asks some disturbing questions about a country that gives poor women opportunities in the military and often takes them away when they return from service.

    Frank reviews "Dead Dames Don't Dance"

    "Dead Dames Don't Dance" at Geva -- or anywhere else for that matter unless you count my minor obsession with the Black Dahlia doing her annual bisected Charleston in my fevered dreams.

    Casey reviews Sisters of Murphy and "Unbridled"

    Friday on the Fringe was full of free offerings, but fun, not free, is the word that epitomized the night for me. I left feeling happy, energized, and excited about the festival; music, dance and photography cavorting in my brain. Sisters of Murphy, a local band that fuses traditional Celtic drinking songs with rock 'n' roll played at that Manhattan Square bowl, a venue that worked well acoustically.

    David reviews "SaMe SeX sHaKeSpEaRe" 2014

    The Rochester Shakespeare Players' "SaMeSeXsHaKeSpEaRe" was a hit at last year's festival, and if you've ever wanted to see Macbeth in a red power suit and heels, or Hamlet as the original emo teen, you have one more chance to see the 2014 edition, on September 26. This is a nicely paced, 45-minute tour through familiar scenes from the plays mentioned above, plus "Twelfth Night" and a sonnet, with the genders reversed ("Macbeth's" Weird Sisters are now Weird Homeless People) or otherwise scrambled.

    Jake reviews Circus Orange's "Tricycle"

    Before I dive into my thoughts on Circus Orange's "Tricycle," I feel like I should give a quick disclaimer: Given the performance's scope, the large crowd, and the layout of Manhattan Square, there were parts of the performance that were just impossible to see from my position. I welcome readers to fill in some of the details and tell us about their perspective of the show.

    Photos from Canary in a Coal Mine, Silent Disco, and "Divas"

    Canary in a Coal Mine will perform again on Saturday, September 20 at 10pm at MuCCC. Silent Disco will occur again Friday, September 26 and Saturday, September 27 at 11pm at the Spiegeltent.

    Frank reviews perCepTION

    So there I was, nursing the blood of the bean from a ceramic chalice, watching the nubile cavalcade's ebb and flow at Java's on Gibbs Street, when what to my wondering eyes appeared but perCepTION on stage kicking out the jams in hiiiiigh gear. This outfit was tres cool with lots of exploratory spirit that never went too far as its members were tethered to the earth and one another.

    Rebecca reviews Cirque du Fringe

    Cirque du Fringe's take on Mardi Gras played to a packed Spiegeltent on Thursday night, and was a thoroughly entertaining trip. Old-timey clowns Tyler and Carl were the informative and charmingly abrasive hosts of the 20 Penny Circus, providing humorous banter and historic tidbits about Fat Tuesday between daring acts by the Kenya Safari Acrobats, who delighted everyone with B-Boy-style acrobatics.

    Adam reviews "Dashboard Dramas"

    Located just outside of the Spiegeltent -- but at the opposite end of the Fringe spectrum as the glitzy spectacle of "Cirque du Fringe" -- "Dashboard Dramas" is a no-frills affair, though it still completely encapsulates the spirit of the festival: It's fast, fun, and wildly creative. Directed by Patricia Lewis and written by Abby DeVuyst and Kerry Young, the show's format is ingenious: four parked cars along the edge of the Spiegelgarden, each assigned a number from one through four.

    Photos from "The Cougar & the Cabana Boy"

    In this original musical comedy, cougars fraternize with their pool boys. Check out future performances on Thursday, September 25th, Friday, September 26th, and Saturday, September 27th at the TheatreROCS Stage at Xerox Auditorium as part of the 2014 First Niagara Rochester Fringe Festival.

    FRINGE FEST 2014: City's Daily Fringe Blogs

    Reviews and photos from the First Niagara Rochester Fringe Festival
    The 2014 First Niagara Rochester Fringe Festival runs September 18-27, and City Newspaper will be out EVERY NIGHT of the festival, covering multiple shows. Check in first thing each morning for photos and reviews of the previous night's entertainment, listed below by date.

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